Born To Be Worn by S & T Creations

Posts Tagged ‘Crystals

Jewelry for the New Romantic by Nealay Patel has several surprising beautiful designs.  Nealay hit upon the idea of using beading wire as part of her jewelry design.  His creativity led to this book of designs.  Coated beading wire is no longer a means to an end.  It becomes an integral part of the design itself.

First, you see the design on the cover, where gold beading wire forms perfect loops, with gorgeous Pacific Opal bicones that connect 2 loops, forming figure 8s.  But the focal point of this design is what draws the eye. It’s a series of golden wire loops and bead dangles, along with short links of chain.  The beading wire loops look soft, very feminine.  It is just sturdy enough not to fall and droop.  Yet, unlike regular beading wire, these aren’t stiff, won’t bend and become smashed.  I love the delicate look.  I turned to that project first, and was pleased to see that project, and many more, show variations on the theme, and how to use the instructions to make matching earrings, and in this case, a matching bracelet too.  The earrings look positively fun all by themselves.  Loops of that gold beading wire have a few crystals to catch the light, then a single jump ring below contains small chain, bicone links, and small links.  I think these could be made separately and be a great item for shows.

After seeing these, I skimmed through looking at other earrings in the book.  The Golden Knights design also has a great earring design.  Nealay took a brighter golden beading wire this time and made a series of loops around a central crystal bicone.  But these loops all went the same direction.  They reminded me of looking at drawings of moons going around a planet, only in this case, up and down, instead of the around we usually think of.  On these loops were small gold beads and crystals, with tiny crimps holding them up.  There was another small cluster of beads at the very bottom of these loops.

I found 1 other design that was very different.  She created beaded square frames that were open in the middle.  Inside these were various looks of beading wire, all different. And on these small loopes were various beads and crystals, in colors that match the frames.  He had attached these to form large links, but even a single one would make a great pendant.  And, again, he showed smaller ones for earrings.

I love the way Nealay took beading wire beyond its typical “hidden” state and brought it to the forefront.  He has yet another design where loops form dangling drops, so they are interspersed along a necklace, with cluster of 2 or 3 near the end of a lariat design.  Very fetching.  And again, I must say it is the look of the beading wire that seems at once elegant and feminine, yet strong and dramatic.

If you work with small beads, you will love this book.  And if you don’t, you need this book to expand your own creativity in how you can use beading wire as an integral part of your designs.  One large focal pendant, or loops connecting larger lampwork or polymer clay beads would be a beautiful way to step off from Nealay’s designs into your own projects.

I was working with some copper wire this weekend, trying to work out a bracelet design I had in my head.  I thought the end result, especially with no pattern and no true measuring, came out really well!

I started with square wire from A Beaded Affair.  That’s the frame.  I didn’t want to solder, so I knew I had to wrap it to create the piece.  I measured the wire for 6 inches around, an inch wide, then left about 2 inches for the curves in the center that I could wrap together, adding beads in to finish the design.

I make the 90 degree square corners and then marked the open wire side where the 2 wires overlapped.  That’s where I began curving them inside.  I started with a pair of curving “pliers” I have and then continued, making curves larger until they just touched. Those open curves created the spaces I would eventually fill in with beads.

I grabbed 22 g copper wire and began wrapping, starting with the very center, where my 2 curved ends met.  Once those were solidly wound, I moved to where each curve touched the solid wire on the other side.  I wrapped those, always being sure to keep the coils tight, as straight as possible and close together.  With it wired together, I could begin fitting in crystals.

This was a lot of freeform too.  I didn’t have a pattern nor any end goal in mind.  I basically found the crystals that fit the spaces I wanted to fill and wired in 1 at a time.  I love the 2 oval ones in the center of the swirl. And I liked the way crossing over one wire with another let me fill in more of the negative space with glittery AB Swarovski crystals!

Buy Now!

Endless Sparkle, by Aimee Carpenter, is a great resource if you are looking for wonderful ideas on how to add more brilliance to your designs!

Using seed beads and glorious Swarovski bicones, Aimee shows you how to create dazzling Each of the 17 patterns include a pendant, earrings, and ring or bracelet, so you can easily create customized sets in hundreds of colors. The Projects are:  Chain Necklace,
Simply Pearls, Pearl Drop Earrings, Linked Bracelet, Drop Pendant, Two-drop Earrings, Stacked Earrings,
Crystal Link Bracelet, Combination Earrings, Gypsy Earrings, Chandelier Necklace, Stacked Dangles, Sparkling Chandeliers, Shimmering Headband, Peyote Pendant, Elegant Choker, and Centerpiece Ring.
All the stitches are right-angle weave or peyote, so you aren’t spending endless hours learning a new stitch for every design, you are building on your skill and expertise in timeless stitches you can use again and again.
Add this book to your library and stitch away!  If you have created a piece of jewelry from any design pattern in this book, please let us know!  We’d love to see how you interpret Aimee Carpenter’s patterns to create your own original works!
Kalmbach Books provided the author with a copy of Endless Sparkle for this review.